Infographic: Navigating MIPS, part one

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SOOOOO.... payment and health database scores start with 60% weight on quality; 0% on cost, and quickly evolves to 30% quality and 30% costs, Is this a not so subtle way to implement RATIONING and selective panels for higher reimbursments??? It seems it would benefit a provider to limit their panels of patients to low risk, low utilizers and give them excellent care. When is there going to be a component of patient responsibility in the system ?? Can we deny care to smokers in our panels ??
Name: 
JR morgan
Email: 
jrmcentral-hwc@yahoo.com
One of the main problems that I see with such programs is that they are all set up for primary care physicians. Now, this would be fine if the rest of us weren't held to the same requirements in order to avoid being penalized. Some specialties, like pain management, do not do blood work except to check BUN or INR levels depending on how the patient is being treated and the only urine testing is pregnancy and drug screening. There is just no way that we can meet the criteria offered or am I missing a big part of the program?
Name: 
LL Tin
Email: 
SOUTHERNPAINCONTROLCENTER@GMAIL.COM
Analytical minds, like those of physicians, are often set adrift in a sea of questions and feel difficulty in accepting new ideas. Their irrational reaction is to throw sand on the fire, and stomp and move on, with a negative impression. Let's say you do work with a higher percentage of patients who have Hgba1c over 8, even over 10. Well, the quality in the care of these folks will come from the percentage that improve. We have a given population patients, and think of them as existing in some state of health prior to our care for them. Now, think of measuring the difference after we care for them. That is just a little different than the concept of making them all well (ie tip-top). It is the concept of starting a dialogue, and making improvements. It includes continuing to keep regular follow up visits and possibly, justifying more fees, since more office visits will be insinuated. If this sounds corrupt to force patients to make up for new CMS policy, by coming to see your more...tell them about the health issues that they are neglecting instead of bringing the new payment policies into their conversation. Also, the improvement activities, (care coordination) do have an impact on what is the final adjudication of receiving better or worse payments. Basically, nose to grindstone and stay competent. Your recognition will come and you don't need to feel you're being cheated before the system has even been rolled out. Having said that...it is an analytic mind that projects worst-case scenarios. Quite intelligent, actually. This is a case of, "we are not in a position to hold power over the decisions about how we're payed, so let's live with it."
Name: 
Bruce McFarland
Email: 
brucedamon@comcast.net
We can trust CMS to use this program to meet Government goals and it will be yet another ring in the nose to lead health care providers to pass through a one-way gate to Single Payor Hades. Should we celebrate our EMR enabling our acquiescence to this pathway?
Name: 
Robert D Peterson MD
Email: 
rpeterson@suddenlinkmail.com

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Infographic: Navigating MIPS, part one